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RT @marypcbuk: @SwiftOnSecurity Agatha Christie saying that she never expected to be so rich that she could afford a car or so poor that sh…

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@SwiftOnSecurity Agatha Christie saying that she never expected to be so rich that she could afford a car or so poor that she couldn't afford a servant is a great yardstick for the changes over that period


Posted by marypcbuk on Saturday, December 8th, 2018 8:52am
Retweeted by SwiftOnSecurity on Saturday, December 8th, 2018 8:53am


209 likes, 46 retweets
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skorgu
18 hours ago
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RT @jensimmons: “We compete with Google not because it’s a good business opportunity. We compete with Google because the health of the inte…

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“We compete with Google not because it’s a good business opportunity. We compete with Google because the health of the internet and online life depend on competition and choice… If you care about about what’s happening with online life today, take another look at Firefox.”


Posted by jensimmons on Thursday, December 6th, 2018 9:54pm
Retweeted by SwiftOnSecurity on Friday, December 7th, 2018 4:53am


195 likes, 83 retweets
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skorgu
2 days ago
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sirshannon
2 days ago
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Ramen.

Centered

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Someone on the twitter box put the political press's view of Republicans well: they're always the protagonists of the story. They can be up, down, good, bad, evil, but they're still always the main characters of the story. It is their fortunes that the reader/reviewer is made to care about, love them or hate them. It is their fortunes which are tied up, by implication, with the fortune of the country itself.

When Democrats win, the focus remains on Republicans. Obama did manage to break through this, some, but not nearly as much as he should have, especially when Democrats ran everything for two years and the heroes of the story were...the Tea Party.
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benzado
3 days ago
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Case in point: the House Democrats had a press conference last week to announce what they plan to introduce as H.R. 1 for this Congress. The only place I found the video on YouTube was some sketchy re-posting channel. None of the major networks even carried clips.
New York, NY (40.785018,-73.97
skorgu
3 days ago
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Tracking shot of Falcon water landing pic.twitter.com/6Hv2aZhLjM

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Tracking shot of Falcon water landing pic.twitter.com/6Hv2aZhLjM


Posted by elonmusk on Wednesday, December 5th, 2018 10:37pm


51411 likes, 8735 retweets
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skorgu
4 days ago
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Holy fuckballs!
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greyhairedgeekgirl: wtfzeus: thats-classics-for-you: beautytrut...

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greyhairedgeekgirl:

wtfzeus:

thats-classics-for-you:

beautytruthandstrangeness:

naamahdarling:

winneganfake:

theolduvaigorge:

Dancing Goddesses

These are AWESOME.

(Source: Nina Paley)

I.. the sheela…. I….


*falls over laughing*


Those are all AWESOME.

oh my god, the lions just boppin’ along holy ffff

THIS IS MY 2018.

My life is now complete

Let’s all enjoy this one while we can. I can’t fucking believe this. 

YES YES YES PLEASE

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skorgu
4 days ago
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karmakaze
4 days ago
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07974
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Tax revenue from legalized marijuana eyed for subway repairs

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The legalization and taxation of marijuana could garner $670 million annually for New York that could help fund subway repairs

State and city officials have started entertaining a new method of funding dire repairs to the subway, the New York Times reports. In addition to implementing congestion pricing in some areas of Manhattan, some local leaders are leaning into using the taxes from legalized marijuana for boosting subway repairs.

The MTA estimates it will cost upwards of $40 billion over ten years to bring the subway into the 21st century (or, at least, some kind of working order.) But $40 billion is just a drop in the bucket of what taxes from legalized marijuana in New York are projected to reach: A report released in June by the governor’s health commissioner found that legalizing pot could generate up to $670 million in annual tax revenue for the state.

One of the major benefits of using tax revenue from pot is that, as a new revenue stream, it would not be diverting funds from other public services. A new report by NYU’s Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, authored by Mitchell L. Moss, also notes that the revenue source has the potential for growth in future decades.

A handful of local officials have informally endorsed the idea—City Council Speaker and possible 2021 mayoral candidate Corey Johnson among them. “The biggest issue we hear about as elected officials is the state of the subway system,” Johnson told the Times. “To be able to tie these things together is something that could be highly impactful and potentially transformative.”

Governor Andrew Cuomo, who oversees the MTA, has neither announced support for or opposition to the concept. But using tax revenue from marijuana legalization is one of about a dozen ideas being explored by a 10-person panel called the Metropolitan Transportation Sustainability Advisory Workgroup that’s been convened by state lawmakers. Those on the panel include State Senator Michael Gianaris of Queens, who supports marijuana legalization; former City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito; and MTA Board Vice Chairman Fernando Ferrer.

In June, a study commissioned by Governor Cuomo by the state’s health commissioner recommended legalizing marijuana, citing the $670 million in annual tax revenue. The Rudin Center report also found that 62 percent of Americans now support legalizing marijuana. “[T]he situation on marijuana is changing,” Cuomo said, noting that the neighboring states of Massachusetts and New Jersey are moving forward with plans to legalize pot.

The Rudin Center report put out some searing words on the issue: “New York State is not a leader, but it need not be a laggard.”

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skorgu
4 days ago
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An obviously good idea so I can't wait to see how Cuomo fucks it up.
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HarlandCorbin
3 days ago
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Not sure that the author understands "a drop in the bucket". $40 billion over 10 years averages to $400 million a year. Estimates are up to $670 million a year in revenue to the state. So the NYC subway is expected to use 2/3 or more of the state's yearly tax take?

I know that New York State is really New York City and its big back yard, but this seems pretty ridiculous.
skorgu
3 days ago
The counties served by the NYCT alone are 43% of the state population. Add MNR and LIRR and it's ~68%. The suburb counties probably shouldn't count 100% in this analysis but they definitely shouldn't be 0 either IMO. 2/3 may not be workable in reality but as a negotiating position it seems reasonable. *shrug*
HarlandCorbin
3 days ago
I guess I never realized just how much of NYS' population is really tied up in the NYC metro area. Still, it seems unworkable that 2/3 of the revenue for a statewide tax would go to one part of the state, but the rest of the state gets drowned out by NYC I suppose. Also, as I read somewhere else, some of the revenue will have to go to managing the new marketplace and regulatory oversight. That's going to thin out the available money. I'm not saying that NYC transit doesn't need the money, I know it does, but that it doesn't sound workable to me in the way proposed.
skorgu
3 days ago
It's even worse if you look at dollars instead of people. The NYC metro area is either 2/3 or 80+% of the state tax revenue: https://www.politifact.com/new-york/statements/2018/feb/01/robert-mujica/do-downstate-ny-residents-contribute-more-income-t/ That said, I agree it's never going to happen because the city gets comprehensively screwed at every opportunity because politics.
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