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Today I learned that a large number of people cannot imagine any possible reason besides "I am too snooty" for why someone wouldn't want to talk to their rideshare driver. Wow. twitter.com/esyudkowsky/st…

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Today I learned that a large number of people cannot imagine any possible reason besides "I am too snooty" for why someone wouldn't want to talk to their rideshare driver. Wow. twitter.com/esyudkowsky/st…

Hey @Uber and @lyft, apparently there's a ton of people who really really really want a "no conversation please" option in the app settings, and would instantly switch away from your competitor if you added that feature first.


Posted by ESYudkowsky on Saturday, December 16th, 2017 2:27am


222 likes, 32 retweets

Posted by ESYudkowsky on Saturday, December 16th, 2017 6:46am


47 likes, 2 retweets
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skorgu
1 day ago
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Really it should be a breathalyzer and only attempt conversation if I'm at least 1.3 sheets to the wind.
freeAgent
14 hours ago
The last ridesharing driver I had said he was both a (recently) former pastor and a trucker and conveyed a story about how he pressured a couple to get married (at their own wedding) after the fiance's boyfriend on the side showed up and interrupted the ceremony. Apparently, they went through with it anyway, the wife turned out to be pregnant, and the husband asked for a divorce a week later...at least if you believe his story. He also interrogated my wife and me (we were riding from the airport) about our own relationship. On the ride prior to that (to the airport), our ridesharing driver engaged in a very long and repetitive conversation about conspiracy theories regarding the earth being flat and the moon being a projection. He kept telling me that I should watch Youtube videos of the moon that supposedly show evidence of that claim while simultaneously saying that he himself didn't believe the moon projector theory. This is why I try not to talk to ridesharing drivers beyond initial pleasantries.
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"You're not being too paranoid."

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For the blissfully unaware, Anglin is a neo-Nazi troll and propagandist who runs The Daily Stormer, one of the more prominent sites of the white supremacist web. The passages selected by Vox Day in his blog post suggested that Anglin is persnickety about detail and presentation ― except on the subject of the Jews, who are to be blamed "for everything."
HuffPost has acquired the 17-page document in its entirety, as well as transcripts from an IRC channel where the document was shared in an effort to recruit new writers. It's more than a style guide for writing internet-friendly neo-Nazi prose; it's a playbook for the alt-right.
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fxer
1 day ago
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definitely worth the read, they aren't "simple hillbilly retards" pushing this agenda. know your enemy
Bend, Oregon
skorgu
2 days ago
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Holy shit.
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For the Easiest Duck Confit at Home, Go Sous Vide

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There are few preparations better suited to sous vide cooking than confit, a technique that traditionally involves gently cooking a meat in its own rendered fat. Using sous vide to make duck confit eliminates the need for rendered fat, and the precise temperature control allows you to cook the legs for the absolute best texture—insanely silky and fork-tender. Read More
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skorgu
2 days ago
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Definitely going to try this.
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Logitech G903 & Powerplay review: A wireless gaming mouse recharged by its own mat

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logitech-powerplay-review-1

I’ve already reviewed the Logitech G603, which for me was the perfect, non-ridiculous wireless gaming mouse but for some facepalmy design that made it too uncomfortable to use without brutal modification. Today I’ve got its bigger, also wireless brother, the Logitech G903 to look at.

The G903 has similar but improved innards, a different, tweakable design, a fancier scrollwheel and buttons and, the headline feature, an extra-purchase mousemat that wirelessly recharges the mouse’s battery while you use the bally thing (i.e.: never worry about running out of charge while your mid-way through sticking a sword through something’s tummy ever again). WITCHCRAFT.

(more…)

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skorgu
3 days ago
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Boy that's expensive. Neat idea though.
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RT @Bouletcorp: "French is Weird" #05 Today: Butts. A deep and touchy subject. #Butts pic.twitter.com/GYwk5YfmT5

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"French is Weird" #05
Today: Butts.
A deep and touchy subject.
#Butts pic.twitter.com/GYwk5YfmT5





Posted by Bouletcorp on Wednesday, December 13th, 2017 11:06pm
Retweeted by cstross on Wednesday, December 13th, 2017 11:09pm


2195 likes, 1165 retweets
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skorgu
3 days ago
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Light Camera Founder Explains Delays, Software Bugs, and Slow Data Transfer

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Light has shipped 2,000 of its multi-lens cameras, and says a deal with a cell phone manufacturer is in the works
Photo: Light

Light, the company that aims to revolutionize photography by digitally combining the output of dozens of small, low-cost camera modules with plastic lenses to create professional-quality images, started filling pre-orders last July, after about a year of delays.

Reviews, to date, have been less than enthusiastic, dinging the device on its low light performance, slow transfer rates, focusing issues, and spotty resolution with artifacts. The company promises, however, that these problems are solvable—and will be fixed quickly.

I checked in with Light founder and CTO Rajiv Laroia for the details. (For more on the camera’s development, read this article that Laroia wrote for IEEE Spectrum in October 2016.)

Light founder Rajiv Laroia
Photo: Light
Rajiv Laroia is the founder and CTO of Light. 

“It is minimally viable,” Laroia said of the current version, called the Light L16, and pre-order customers were told that the company had work to do before finalizing their orders. “You can take pictures,” he said, “but it may be frustrating because we are refining the software. We gave the pre-order people an option to get the camera now and help us improve it, or to press a pause button on their purchase until it is good enough for them.”

Some 2,000 customers opted to go through with their purchases since the camera started shipping in July, and all have received their cameras. Next year, Laroia predicts, tens of thousands of cameras will ship to customers. And he expects that the 120-person company will soon announce a deal with a manufacturer to integrate the technology into cell phones, which has been Light’s goal from the beginning.

“The Light camera takes incredible pictures when everything goes right,” Laroia says. “That happens more and more often now, but we have to make the experience more consistent. We know things will get better, and the issues that frustrate people will go away.”

The complaints all stem from recognized software problems, Laroia adds. “The hardware is stable.”

Here’s what Laroia had to say about Light’s efforts so far and what’s coming down the road.

On the one-year delay in ship date (from summer 2016 to July 2017):

Laroia: “The biggest reason for that delay was the availability of our ASIC. That was mostly outside of our control. Until we had the ASIC, part of the software development could go on, but part couldn’t, because we didn’t have access to a lot of images taken under different conditions to use for testing. The ASIC also controls the way we calibrate the camera, the focus—so not having it is not such a trivial matter.”

On the limited ability to process—a.k.a. “develop”—the images on the camera itself, rather than on a separate computer:

Laroia: “We do offer a mode of developing the pictures on the camera that doesn’t use our best algorithm, but rather takes 5 of the 10 images [that the camera captures whenever a user snaps a single photo] and turns them into a 13-megapixel image, intended for sharing on social media. The camera can develop images at the same speed as a desktop computer, but the reason we do not develop in full detail, creating 50-megapixel images, has to do with battery life. Right now, people have said good things about our battery life—you can take 400-plus shots—but if you process every picture you take, the battery life goes down significantly, and then you can find that when you want to take a picture, the camera is out of battery. It seemed like developing a 50-megapixel image that you can’t really view on the camera used a lot of battery for very little benefit.

“But people want better developing on the camera itself, so we are now thinking to put all that processing on the camera, but it will sit in background, and automatically get triggered when you plug the camera into an outlet.”

On the slowness of transferring photos from camera to computer:

Laroia: “We have large files—160 megabytes per picture—that we are not compressing; they are easy to compress to 30 to 40 percent of their size, so when we add compression it will give us a big boost in speed of transfer. It’s not magic—we will do it, it’s just not at the top of the list. And while we are now doing tethered transfer, eventually it will be wireless.”

On other things that need to be fixed:

Laroia: “I have a whole list of items for my team, the algorithm team. And the other teams have priority lists as well. Improving low light performance is a big priority. Putting video on the camera, using one image sensor at a time but switching between sensors for optical zoom. Improving the depth of field algorithm.”

On the future:

Laroia: “We are excited. I know when the software isn’t final, there will be some frustration with end users. Their problems are real, but they are not about the technology; it’s about getting the whole end user experience right. I can already see that the issues will be behind us soon, and we will be able to focus on growth and making everybody’s lives easier.”

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skorgu
4 days ago
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There's a reasonable chance I'll pick up the 2.0 version of this if it ends up better-than-my-phone enough.
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